Stanley Kubrick’s Photos of New York Life in the 40s

A popular filmmaker and creator, Stanly Kubrick is a household name that many love and adore, even this many years later.  He wrote and directed Lolita and Strangelove.  He was an impressive filmmaker that did well in his career in the 1940s.  He inspired the younger generation of filmmakers such as the Coen Brothers and Tim Burton.  They said that the way he created a film and picture allowed them to see what they aspired to be.  Steven Spielberg even credited this great with a quote that speaks to his talent: “Nobody could shoot a picture better in history.”

At the young age of 17, before his introduction to Hollywood, he was making wave with a camera.  He sold a photo to Look magazine when he capture the reaction to the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, spurring his admission to staff.

Upon becoming a filmmaker, you could see his taste for mystery and drama that marked his tastes clearly.  His pieces are still on show even how, with tastes and touches that no one can imitate perfectly.  Even the photos in this collection show his impressive talent.  You can feel his enthusiasam in the image.

1. Self portrait with showgirl Rosemary Williams 1948

Stanley Kubrick’s Photos

2. Student at Columbia University – 1948

Stanley Kubrick’s Photos

3. Shoe Shine Boys – 1947

Stanley Kubrick’s Photos

4. Shoe Shine Boys (Vendor) – 1947

Stanley Kubrick’s Photos

5. Shoe Shine Boys (On Fence) – 1947

Stanley Kubrick’s Photos

6. Johnny on the Spot – 1946

Stanley Kubrick’s Photos

7. Laboratory at Columbia University – 1948

Stanley Kubrick’s Photos

8. High Wire Act – 1948

Stanley Kubrick’s Photos

9. General Dwight D. Eisenhower at Columbia University – 1948

Stanley Kubrick’s Photos

10. Betsy Von Furstenberg – 1949

Stanley Kubrick’s Photos

11. Johnny Grant – 1946

Stanley Kubrick’s Photos

12. Showgirls at the Copacabana Club – 1948

Stanley Kubrick’s Photos

Futuristic Architecture Projects

10 Futuristic Architecture Projects

Artist Transforms Famous Landmarks Into Disney Scenes Using Only Paper