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100 Cameras Were Given To Homeless In London And The Result Left Everyone Speechless

100 Fujifilm disposal cameras were given to homeless people in London who were taking part in the initiative Café Art, which hopes to provide a creative outlet in the form of photography and art for homeless people in the UK.  After some minor training by the Royal Photographic Society, the homeless people were left to their own devices, having been asked to take photos with the theme being ‘My London.’  The project was a resounding success, with 80 cameras returned packed full of photographs. 2,500 photos were developed in total, with 20 of these selected by judges that came from various outlets, including Fujifilm, Amateur Photographer, the London Photo Festival, Christie’s and Homeless Link.  There are now hopes to use crowd funding platforms to get 12 of these images turned into a camera. Considering the quality of the photos and the circumstances in which they were captured, it is hard to imagine a calendar not being a massive hit, which in turn will benefit Café Art and its future endeavours. “All the money raised goes back into the project,” Cafe Art says, “either to pay for the printing of the photographs and calendar, rewarding the winning photographers, buying art materials for art groups affected by homelessness or helping individuals attend art courses.”

More info: cafeart.org.uk | facebook | twitter | kickstarter (h/t: demilkedpetapixel)

Photo by ROL, Which Was Voted To Be The Cover

“We are inspired by the artists and photographers who participate in the project. If it wasn’t for them, we couldn’t create the exhibition and calendar,” CAFÉ ART’s Paul Ryan

homeless people photography

“Telephone Row, Lincoln’s Inn” by XO

“It takes a few months to organise the contest. We have now done it a few times so we can get more done in less time”

homeless people photography

“Left Boot, East London” by Ellen Rostant

“Both partners in this project, Michael and I both do this because we enjoy making a difference in people’s lives. The photos are beautiful, but the changes in the people who took them is even more beautiful to witness”

homeless people photography

“Nature’s Tunnel or Light and the End, Stratford” by Ellen Rostant

“We are inspired by the international response to the Kickstarter campaign this week. People have sent us incredible messages of support and it really does make you realise that there are many people who not only care about helping people affected by homelessness, but they are inspired to join us”

homeless people photography

“Everything I Own or Bags of Life, Strand” by David Tovey

homeless people photography

“Colour Festival, Olympic Park” by Goska Calik

homeless people photography

“Past & Present, City of London” by Ioanna Zagkana

homeless people photography

“Tyre Break, Hackney” by Desmond Henry

homeless people photography

“Tower Bridge PICNIC, Southwark” by Cecie

homeless people photography

“West End Bird, Westminster” by Zin

homeless people photography

“The Artist, Whitechapel” by Michael Crosswaite

homeless people photography

“Shadow of Self, Hyde Park” by Goska Calik

homeless people photography

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homeless people photography

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